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Shriners Hospitals for Children — Galveston

815 Market St. Galveston, TX 77550

Galveston, TX

409-770-6600

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409-770-6600

Complex wound and skin conditions

Since it opened in 1966, Shriners Hospitals for Children — Galveston has been treating children with numerous types of skin conditions.

Some of the conditions we treat include:

The experience of our physicians, along with a track record of excellence and continuing education, makes the Galveston Shriners Hospital a leader in treating these complex wound and skin conditions.

For patient treatment and/or transfer, call our 24-hour emergency line at 409-770-6773. For non-emergency transfers and appointments call 888-215-3109.

Necrotizing skin infections

Necrotizing skin infections are caused by many different types of bacteria. These infections begin at the site of puncture wounds, lacerations, surgical incisions or even begin on healthy skin.

The skin may appear pale at first, but quickly becomes red or bronze in color, warm to the touch and usually swells. As the condition progresses, the skin turns violet and often develops large fluid-filled blisters.

Initially, the area is painful, but as the tissue death advances, nerves are damaged and sensation is lost. Some types of bacteria produce gas bubbles, which will accumulate under the skin and in the blisters, causing the skin to feel "crackly" when touched.

This condition is considered a medical emergency that requires hospitalization and can benefit from skin graft applications by a highly qualified and experienced surgeon.

Necrotizing fasciitis

Necrotizing fasciitis (also called flesh-eating bacteria) is a rare infection in the deeper layers of the skin that spreads easily on the body. In the early stages, symptoms may not be apparent; however, if the bacteria is just beneath the top of the skin, redness and swelling will occur.

Skin color may turn violet, and blisters may form with subsequent death of skin and tissue. Patients with necrotizing fasciitis have a fever and appear very ill; the bacteria release a toxin that can lead to septic shock.

This condition is considered a medical emergency that requires hospitalization and can benefit from skin graft applications by a highly qualified and experienced surgeon.

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (erythema multiforme major) is a serious disorder affecting the skin and mucous membranes related to a hypersensitivity reaction that usually occurs in response to medications and sometimes infection.

This syndrome usually begins with flu-like symptoms, followed by a painful red or purplish rash that spreads and blisters, eventually causing the top layer of skin to die and shed (slough).

This condition is considered a medical emergency that requires hospitalization and can benefit from skin graft applications by a highly qualified and experienced surgeon.

Toxic epidermal necrolysis

Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare, life-threatening condition, usually induced by a reaction to a medication. TEN can affect many parts of the body, but most severely affects the mucous membranes.

The severe presentation of TEN is often preceded by one to two weeks of fever and symptoms that mimic an upper respiratory infection. A rash follows covering large and varied parts of the body, and is usually warm and appears red.

The body's reaction to a medication results in extra fluid in the deep part of the skin, causing separation of the skin layers and shedding (sloughing). The mucous membranes become blistered and eroded.

This condition is considered a medical emergency that requires hospitalization and can benefit from skin graft applications by a highly qualified and experienced surgeon.