At Shriners Hospitals for Children, the health and safety of our patients, families, volunteers and staff is our top priority. With the evolving situation regarding COVID-19, we are closely monitoring updates from local health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and are actively following their recommendations.

If your child has an upcoming appointment, please contact your local Shriners Hospitals for Children location.

Shriners Hospitals for Children — Honolulu visitor information.

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About us

About us

Shriners Hospitals for Children — Honolulu provides the highest quality care for orthopaedic and neuromusculoskeletal disorders and conditions. Our world-class doctors and staff members are committed to improving the lives of children in Hawaii and the Pacific region, and are specialized in bone, muscle, joint and sports injuries.

Our two-story state-of-the-art facility provides Hawaii’s children the best orthopaedic and neurodevelopmental care through specialties that include a fracture clinic, surgery, physical therapy, occupational therapy, radiology, orthotics and prosthetics workshop, and other ancillary services.

Our hospital is colorful, kid-friendly and designed to place patients and families at ease with the aloha spirit.

Shriners Hospitals for Children — Honolulu accepts insurance and provides care regardless of the families' ability to pay.

Distinctions:

  • Shriners Hospitals for Children — Honolulu is an academic teaching and research institution. Partners include the University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine’s Pediatric and Orthopaedic Residency Programs, the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Pacific University, Chaminade University, and NYU Langone Hospital.
  • Health care providers serve children and families on the neighbor islands through satellite clinics. Regular visits to outreach clinics enable greater care for children in the Pacific Basin.
  • Affiliated with the Aloha Shrine Temple in Hawaii.

Safety and satisfaction

  • Fully accredited by The Joint Commission.
  • Zero spinal surgical site infections since September 2012.
  • Leader in the state for employee flu vaccinations. Since 2014, at least 90% of Shriners Hospitals for Children — Honolulu employees, volunteers, students and health care professionals received the flu vaccine to protect our keiki.

History

Our model for care was established by the Shriners, the fraternal organization for which the hospital is named. Determined to give all children access to specialized pediatric care, the Shriners opened their first hospital in 1922.

Shriners Hospitals for Children opened as a place where children with the crippling effects of polio, clubfoot and other orthopaedic conditions could receive life-changing medical care.

Recognized as one of the world’s greatest philanthropies, Shriners Hospitals for Children has evolved into an international hospital system recognized for its devotion to transforming the lives of children through specialized care and research. It is a destination of choice for parents whose children have orthopaedic problems, spinal cord injuries, burns, cleft lip and other complex surgical needs. Care is funded by the Shriners Hospitals for Children endowment, which is sustained by your donations. All children receive care regardless of the families’ ability to pay.

Shriners Hospitals for Children — Honolulu timeline of events

  • 1923: Shriners Hospitals for Children — Honolulu, the second hospital in the Shriners Hospitals system, was established in the rear wing of the Kauikeolani Children’s Hospital in Liliha (currently the Rehab Hospital of the Pacific). Though Hawaii was a U.S. territory at the time, the location was chosen by Imperial Sir James McCandless. Known as “Sunny Jim,” McCandless became the first and only member of Honolulu’s Aloha Temple to be named Imperial Potentate in 1922. Today, there are 22 locations in the Shriners Hospitals system in North America, Mexico and Canada.
  • 1930: The present 7-acre site at 1310 Punahou St. was deeded in perpetuity to Shriners Hospitals for Children in loving memory of John and Wilhemine Dowsett. The hospital operated out of the Dowsett mansion until 1960.
  • 1934: President Franklin D. Roosevelt became the first president to visit Hawaii while in office. While he was in Honolulu, Roosevelt, who was suffering from polio, made a surprise visit to the Honolulu Shriners Hospital.
  • 1967: A 40-bed hospital was built, replacing the Dowsett family mansion.
  • 2007: The hospital broke ground on its $73 million present-day facility, which includes a state-of-the-art hospital, administrative offices building and a family center.
  • 2009: The new hospital opened its doors. The hospital is licensed for 24 beds (16 acute care and 8 outpatient beds) and is 40% larger than the former hospital.
  • 2013: The neurodevelopmental clinic opened.
  • 2016: The hospital expanded the family center for out-of-town guests from 10 to 17 rooms.

Signature clinical programs

Patient eligibility

Children and teens up to age 18 are eligible for care at Shriners Hospitals for Children if there is a reasonable possibility they can benefit from the specialized services available. In some cases, care may be extended to patients age 21. Acceptance is based solely on a child’s medical needs, regardless of the families’ ability to pay.

Referral and appointments

Parents, physicians and other health care providers wishing to make an appointment or refer a child may call 808-941-4466.

Care

  • Since opening in 1923, more than 41,000 patients have received care at the Honolulu Shriners Hospital.
  • Roughly 8,000 patients are seen each year.
  • 77% of patients are from Hawaii.
  • 24 inpatient beds and 10 outpatient clinic exam rooms.
  • 17 rooms in the family center to accommodate out-of-town guests.
  • Rehabilitation gym for physical and occupational therapy, with kid-friendly ceiling and floor art as well as private treatment rooms with a seating area for wheelchair exams.
  • Recreational therapy department allows for medical play, coping activities, socialization, networking and support services to enhance recovery of our patients. Highlights include a basketball court, therapy pool and kitchenette.

Our commitment to the community

Shriners Hospitals for Children — Honolulu, like the other U.S. based hospitals in the Shriners Hospitals for Children health care system, reaffirms its commitment to excellence of care through the development of its Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA). The CHNA is a requirement for tax-exempt hospitals to engage their servicing community every three years and assess their health needs. Based on the findings, we have developed an action plan to work alongside community stakeholders to address the health needs of the community.