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news item News Friday, March 15, 2019 Friday, March 15, 2019 3:33 PM - Friday, March 15, 2019 3:33 PM

"A Nurses Love” is a photo contest winner

Lexington Shriners Medical Center photo selected for new national photo exhibit

A photograph of a patient and nurse at Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center — Lexington, captured by photographer Priscilla Baierlein, was selected for inclusion in the biennial Children’s Hospitals Photo Exhibit, the result of a national competition administered by the Children’s Hospital Association (CHA).

The new exhibit of 50 winning photographs was curated by a panel of distinguished judges, including renowned photographer and author Anne Geddes. Showcasing the ways children’s hospitals help all children thrive, the online exhibit includes stories behind the photos, allowing viewers to read first-hand accounts from patients, parents, doctors and other health care providers.  

“We’re thrilled this photo depicting our patient’s experience with Lexington Shriners was selected for this unique exhibit,” said Tony Lewgood, administrator. “The collective work of all the children’s hospitals in the country has and continues to benefit the lives of all children, and this exhibit by CHA helps tell that important story.”

Shriners Medical Center’s photo, titled A Nurse’s Love, was chosen from more than 370 images submitted by nearly 60 children’s hospitals. Joining Geddes on the judging panel were Sandy Adams, photo journalist and officer, The Exposure Group; Lily Francesca Alt, photo director, Parents magazine; Lori Epstein, photo director, National Geographic Kids Books; and Eric Gapsch, graphic designer, CHA.

The Lexington Shriners Medical Center’s photo also joins winning photos from the Chicago, Northern California and Tampa Shriners Hospitals in the exhibition.

View the online exhibit.

A Nurse’s Love: the story behind the photo   

Two-year-old Maggie had just received her fourth Mehta cast to treat idiopathic scoliosis, a curvature of the spine. Mehta casting is a succession of casts that have been shown to be the best treatment for children with scoliosis, typically applying a new cast every six to eight weeks. Full correction can be achieved without invasive surgery.

“Patients tolerate casts extremely well and is a much better option than bracing,” said Henry J. Iwinski, Jr., M.D., chief of staff and pediatric orthopaedic surgeon at the Lexington Shriners Medical Center. “This treatment method has been revolutionary in the care of these children.”

After Maggie came out of anesthesia with a pink Mehta cast wrapped around her stomach, she became anxious. Katy, a post-anesthesia care unit nurse, picked Maggie up to comfort her as she rested after a tough procedure.

“As a parent, there are no words to describe how you feel when you see a picture of a nurse holding and loving your child, during one of their most vulnerable times, as if she were their own,” said Megan, Maggie’s mother. “We are thankful for the peace of mind knowing our daughter is being cared for by staff that not only focuses on providing the best medical treatment, but also focuses on making sure she feels safe, comfortable and loved.”